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Anxiety: Stop Negative Thoughts

Table of Contents


Introduction

Anxiety is having too much fear and worry. Some people have what's called generalized anxiety disorder. They feel worried and stressed about many things. Often they worry about even small things. Some people also may have panic attacks. A panic attack is a sudden feeling of extreme anxiety.

People who have social anxiety disorder worry that they will do or say the wrong thing and embarrass themselves around others.

Anxiety can cause physical symptoms like a fast heartbeat and sweaty hands. It can make you limit your activities and can make it hard to enjoy your life.

Healthy thinking can help you prevent or control anxiety.


How can you use healthy thinking to cope with anxiety?

Notice and stop your thoughts

The first step is to notice and stop your negative thoughts or "self-talk." Self-talk is what you think and believe about yourself and your experiences. It's like a running commentary in your head. Your self-talk may be rational and helpful. Or it may be negative and not helpful.

Ask about your thoughts

The next step is to ask yourself whether your thoughts are helpful or unhelpful. Look at what you're saying to yourself. Does the evidence support your negative thought? Some of your self-talk may be true. Or it may be partly true but exaggerated.

One of the best ways to see if you are worrying too much is to look at the odds. What are the odds, or chances, that the bad thing you are worried about will happen? If you have a job review that has one small criticism among many compliments, what are the odds that you really are in danger of losing your job? The odds are probably low.

There are several kinds of irrational thoughts. Here are a few types to look for:

Choose your thoughts

The next step is to choose a helpful thought to replace the unhelpful one.

Keeping a journal of your thoughts is one of the best ways to practice stopping, asking, and choosing your thoughts. It makes you aware of your self-talk. Write down any negative or unhelpful thoughts you had during the day. If you think you might not remember them at the end of your day, keep a notepad with you so that you can write down any thoughts as they happen. Then write down helpful messages to correct the negative thoughts.

If you do this every day, accurate, helpful thoughts will soon come naturally to you.

But there may be some truth in some of your negative thoughts. You may have some things you want to work on. If you didn't perform as well as you would like on something, write that down. You can work on a plan to correct or improve that area.

If you want, you also could write down what kind of irrational thought you had. Journal entries might look something like this:

Thought diary

Stop your negative thought


Ask what type of negative thought you had


Choose an accurate, helpful thought


"I get so nervous speaking in public. I just know that people are thinking about how bad I am at speaking."


Focusing on the negative


"I'm probably better at public speaking than I think I am. The last time I gave a talk, people applauded afterward."


"I have to be in control all the time or I can't cope with things."


Should


"I can only control how I think about things or what I do. I can't control some things, like how other people feel and act."


"I'll never feel normal. I worry about everything all the time."


Overgeneralizing


"I've laughed and relaxed before. I can practice letting go of my worries."


"My headaches must mean there is something seriously wrong with me."


Catastrophic thinking


"A lot of things can cause headaches. Most of them are minor and go away."


References

Other Works Consulted


Credits for Anxiety: Stop Negative Thoughts

Current as of: September 23, 2020

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Catherine D. Serio PhD - Behavioral Health
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Christine R. Maldonado PhD - Behavioral Health


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