Healthwise
To print: Use your web browser's print feature. Close this window after printing.

Fear and Anger in PTSD

Table of Contents


Overview

After a traumatic event, you may develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). You may not feel close to people, or you may feel on edge. Your friends and family may tell you that you don't seem the same. You may feel angry.

Anger is a normal response to a traumatic event. Anger gives you the energy to act quickly and help yourself or others. Your body goes into a "survival" mode. After the event, when you no longer need to act, your anger goes away.

But if you have PTSD, your anger may get out of control. This means you lose your temper and may feel like harming others or yourself.

When you have PTSD, you can get stuck in a "ready to act" mode. Your anger is always there, just under the surface. When something bothers you, you may not think about the situation before acting. You go into survival mode, and your anger flares up.

If you are stuck in this mode, you may:

What you can do

Here are some ideas for dealing with your anger:

For more information, see the topic Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.


Credits for Fear and Anger in PTSD

Current as of: February 9, 2022

Author: Healthwise Staff
Medical Review:
Adam Husney MD - Family Medicine
Kathleen Romito MD - Family Medicine
Jessica Hamblen PhD - Post Traumatic Stress Disorder


Note: The "printer friendly" document will not contain all the information available in the online document. Some information (e.g. cross-references to other topics, definitions or medical illustrations) is only available in the online version.

© 1995-2022 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.
This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information.